Glossary - Page 4 of 5

(English version of “Noli Me Tangere”)

Moro
Mohammedan Malay of southern Mindanao and Sulu.
mutya
Some object with talismanic properties, rabbit’s foot.
nakú
A Tagalog exclamation of surprise, wonder, etc.
nipa
Swamp-palm, with the imbricated leaves of which the roots and sides of the common Filipino houses are constructed.
nito
A climbing fern whose glossy, wiry leaves are used for making fine hats, cigar-cases, etc.
novena
A devotion consisting of prayers recited on nine consecutive days, asking for some special favor; also, a booklet of these prayers.
oy
An exclamation to attract attention, used toward inferiors and in familiar intercourse: probably a contraction of the Spanish imperative, oye, listen!
pakó
An edible fern.
palasán
A thick, stout variety of rattan, used for walking-sticks.
pandakaki
A low tree or shrub with small, star-like flowers.
pañuelo
A starched neckerchief folded stiffly over the shoulders, fastened in front and falling in a point behind: the most distinctive portion of the customary dress of the Filipino women.
papaya
The tropical papaw, fruit of the melon-tree.
paracmason
Freemason, the bête noire of the Philippine friar.
peseta
A silver coin, in value one-fifth of a peso or thirty-two cuartos.
peso
A silver coin, either the Spanish peso or the Mexican dollar, about the size of an American dollar and of approximately half its value.
piña
Fine cloth made from pineapple-leaf fibers.
proper names

The author has given a simple and sympathetic touch to his story throughout by using the familiar names commonly employed among the Filipinos in their home-life.  Some of these are nicknames or pet names, such as Andong, Andoy, Choy, Neneng (Baby), Puté, Tinchang, and Yeyeng.  Others are abbreviations or corruptions of the Christian names, often with the particle ng or ay added, which is a common practice: Andeng, Andrea; Doray, Teodora; Iday, Brigida (Bridget); [502]Sinang, Lucinda (Lucy); Sipa, Josefa;

Sisa, Narcisa; Teo, Teodoro (Theodore); Tiago, Santiago (James); Tasio, Anastasio; Tiká, Escolastica; Tinay, Quintina; Tinong, Saturnino.

Provincial
Head of a religious order in the Philippines.
querida
Paramour, mistress: from the Spanish, beloved.
real
One-eighth of a peso, twenty cuartos.
sala
The principal room in the more pretentious Philippine houses.

Learn this Filipino word:

matigás ang mukhá